A children's bookcase

More importantly, tell a story. Every project has a raison d'être or mainspring. My professors in this class called it a story. Matthew Frederick calls it a parti and defines it as the central idea or concept behind a building. The raison d'être is the driving force behind the creative process and, eventually, becomes the personality of the finished product.
I chose Calvin and Hobbes as inspiration for this project to celebrate how Bill Watterson's wise words on creating a life for yourself have guided me in my postsecondary education. Also in that speech, he reflects on the raison d'être of his comic strip.
I always admired the trees from Bill Watterson's strips. So, I started sketching by exploring and imitating his art style. They became one of my primary sources of inspiration for the final concept.
A thumbnail sketch of one of my first concepts.
While looking at strips featuring Calvin's treehouse, I started playing with the concept of boxes sharing negative space. I pursued this concept, seeing that there was compicated joints I wanted to explore how to resolve.
While looking at strips featuring Calvin's treehouse, I started playing with the concept of boxes sharing negative space. I pursued this concept, seeing that there was compicated joints I wanted to explore how to resolve.
As for the upper "impossible joint", the simple answer was to eliminate it. Again, using a perpendicular irregular shape at the intersection, I could dodge the impossible. These ideas made sense for production, but not for the raison d'être of this project. I couldn't lose sight of story.
As for the upper "impossible joint", the simple answer was to eliminate it. Again, using a perpendicular irregular shape at the intersection, I could dodge the impossible. These ideas made sense for production, but not for the raison d'être of this project. I couldn't lose sight of story.
Thinking back to my favourite trees, I realised they could become the irregular shapes I needed for the structure, and add the feature of Calvin and Hobbes.
Always ready for a challenge (read: the most complex solution) I sought using finger joints for the few 90 degree joints. Kenny advised a simple rabbet with glue would be solid enough.
The final solution for the upper acute angle joint and my version of Bill Watterson's trees. There is a similar shape behind, with crossbeams nailed into the top and bottom for strength.
I scaled the right side of the bookcase to fit the hardcover Calvin and Hobbes collection just right. In a sense, this bookshelf is more a display case than a bookcase.
I also painted at the lower obtuse edge to cover imperfections.
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